Archive for the ‘The Episcopal Church’ Category

Before Thy Throne, O God, We Kneel   Leave a comment

Above:  Throne of God

Image in the Public Domain

Text (published in 1925) by William Boyd Carpenter (1841-1918), Anglican Bishop of Ripon then Canon of Westminster

Hymn Source = The Hymnal 1940 (1943), The Episcopal Church

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Before thy Throne, O God, we kneel;

Give us a conscience quick to feel,

A ready mind to understand

The meaning of thy chastening hand;

Whate’er the pain and shame may be,

Bring us, O Father, nearer thee.

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Search out our hearts and make us true,

Wishful to give to all their due;

From love of pleasure, lust of gold,

From sins which make the heart grow cold,

Wean us and train us with thy rod;

Teach us to know our faults, O God.

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For sins of heedless word and deed,

For pride ambitious to succeed,

For crafty trade and subtle snare

To catch the simple unaware,

For lives bereft of purpose high,

Forgive, forgive, O Lord, we cry.

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Let the fierce fires which burn and try,

Our inmost spirits purify;

Consume the ill; purge out the shame;

O God, be with us in the flame;

A new-born people may we rise,

More pure, more true, more nobly wise.

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From God Christ’s Deity Came Forth   4 comments

Above:  Icon of Christ Pantocrator

Scanned by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

Original Syraic Text by St. Ephrem of Edessa (306/307-373)

English Translation by J. Howard Rhys (b. 1917)

English Translation adapted and altered by F. Bland Tucker (1895-1984)

Hymn Source = The Hymnal 1982 (1985), The Episcopal Church

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From God Christ’s deity came forth, his manhood from humanity;

his priesthood from Melchizedek, his royalty from David’s tree:

praised be his Oneness.

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He joined with guests at wedding feast, yet in the wilderness did fast;

he taught within the temple’s gates; his people saw him die at last:

praised be his teaching.

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The dissolute he did not scorn, nor turn from those who were in sin,

he for the righteous did rejoice but bade the fallen to come in:

praised be his mercy.

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He did not disregard the sick; to simple ones his word was given;

and he descended to the earth and his work done, went up to heaven:

praised be his coming.

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Who then, my Lord, compares to you?  The Watcher slept, the great was small,

the Pure baptized, the Life who died, the King abased to honor all:

praised by your glory.

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Not By Thy Mighty Hand   1 comment

Above:  Parable of the Sower

Image in the Public Domain

Text (1863) by James Russell Woodford (1820-1885), Anglican Bishop of Ely (1873-1885)

Hymn Source = The Hymnal 1916 (1918), The Episcopal Church

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Not by Thy Mighty hand,

Thy wondrous works alone,

But by the marvels of Thy Word,

Thy glory, Lord, is known.

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Forth from the eternal gates,

Thine everlasting home,

To sow the seed of truth below,

Thou didst vouchsafe to come.

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And still from age to age,

Thou, gracious Lord, hast been

The Bearer forth of goodly seed,

The Sower still unseen.

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And Thou wilt come again,

And heaven beneath Thee bow,

To reap the harvest Thou has sown,

Sower and Reaper Thou.

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Watch, Lord, Thy harvest field,

With Thine unsleeping eye,

The children of the Kingdom keep

To Thy Epiphany;

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That when, in Thy great day,

The tares shall severed be,

We may be surely gathered in

With all Thy saints to Thee.

O For a Closer Walk With God   2 comments

Above:  Snow-Covered Trail, Seward, Alaska, 1916

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-ppmsc-01960

Text (1769; published in 1772) by William Cowper (1731-1800)

Hymn Source #1  = The Hymnal (1941), Evangelical and Reformed Church

Hymn Source #2 = The Hymnal 1940 Companion (1949), The Episcopal Church

The original text was six stanzas long.

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O for a closer walk with God,

A calm and heavenly frame,

A light to shine upon the road

That leads me to the Lamb.

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Where is the blessedness I knew,

When first I saw the Lord?

Where is the soul-refreshing view

Of Jesus, and his word?

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What peaceful hours I then enjoyed!

How sweet their memory still!

But they have left an aching void

The world can never fill.

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Return, O Holy Dove, return,

Sweet messenger of rest;

I hate the sins that made Thee mourn,

And drove Thee from my breast.

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The dearest idol I have known,

Whate’er that idol be,

Help me to tear it from Thy throne,

And worship only Thee.

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So shall my walk be close with God,

Calm and serene my frame;

So purer light shall mark the road

That leads me to the Lamb.

Lord Christ, When First Thou Cam’st to Men   3 comments

Above:  A Crucifix

Photograph by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

Text (1928) by Walter Russell Bowie (1882-1969)

Hymn Source = The Hymnal 1940 (1943), The Episcopal Church

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Lord Christ, when first thou cam’st to men,

Upon a cross they bound thee,

And mocked thy saving kingship then

By thorns with which they crowned thee;

And still our wrongs may weave thee now

New thorns to pierce that steady brow,

And robe of sorrow round thee.

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O aweful Love, which found no room

In life where sin denied thee,

And, doomed to death, must bring to doom

The power which crucified thee,

Till not a stone was left on stone,

And all a nation’s pride, o’erthrown,

Went down to dust beside thee!

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New advent of the love of Christ,

Shall we again refuse thee,

Till in the night of hate and war

We perish as we lose thee?

From old unfaith our souls release

To seek the kingdom of thy peace,

By which alone we choose thee.

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O wounded hands of Jesus, burn

In us thy new creation;

Our pride is dust, our vaunt is stilled,

We wait thy revelation;

O love that triumphs over loss,

We bring our hearts before thy cross,

To finish thy salvation.

A Prayer for Constructive and Faithful Living   1 comment

Above:  Jack Layton Grave

Image Source = necropolis-107

This prayer includes language from the farewell letter by Jack Layton:

My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world.

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God of compassion, may we, trusting in you,

act faithfully in the the knowledge that

love is better than anger,

hope is better than fear,

and optimism is better than despair.

In the name of Christ may we who follow him

be loving, hopeful, and optimistic,

and therefore change the world for the better

and glorify your holy Name.  Amen.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 6, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF FRANKLIN CLARK FRY, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED LUTHERAN CHURCH IN AMERICA AND THE LUTHERAN CHURCH IN AMERICA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CLAUDE OF BESANCON, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST, MONK, ABBOT, AND BISHOP

THE FEAST OF HENRY JAMES BUCKOLL, AUTHOR AND TRANSLATOR OF HYMNS

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM KETHE, PRESBYTERIAN HYMN WRITER

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https://blogatheologica.wordpress.com/2017/06/07/a-prayer-for-constructive-and-faithful-living/

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O Thou, Who Gav’st Thy Servant Grace   1 comment

saint-john-and-the-cup

Above:  Saint John and the Cup, by El Greco

Image in the Public Domain

Text by Reginald Heber (1783-1826)

Hymn Source = The Hymnal 1916 (1918), The Episcopal Church

A hymn for the Feast of St. John the Evangelist

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O Thou, Who gav’st Thy servant grace

On Thee the living Rock to rest,

To look on Thine unveiled face,

And lean on Thy protecting breast;

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Grant us, O King of mercy, still

To feel Thy presence from above,

And in Thy word and in Thy will

To hear Thy voice and know Thy love;

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And when the toils of life are done,

And nature waits Thy just decree,

To find our rest beneath Thy throne,

And look in certain hope to Thee.

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To Thee, O Jesus, Light of Light,

Whom as their King the saints adore,

Thou strength and refuge in the fight,

Be laud and glory evermore.