Archive for the ‘The Church Hymnary–Revised Edition (1927)’ Category

One Thing I of the Lord Desire   2 comments

Above:  Grace Episcopal Church, Gainesville, Georgia, July 7, 2018

Image Source = Bill Monk, Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta

Text (1887) by Walter Chalmers Smith (1824-1908)

Hymn Source = The Church Hymnary–Revised Edition (1927), of various Presbyterian denominations

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One thing I of the Lord desire,–

For all my way hath miry been–

Be it by water for by fire,

O make me clean!

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If clearer vision Thou impart,

Grateful and glad my soul shall be;

But yet to have a purer heart

Is more to me.

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Yea, only as the heart is clean

May larger vision yet be mine,

For mirrored in its depths are seen

The things divine.

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I watch to shun the miry way,

And stanch the spring of guilty thought;

But, watch and wrestle as I may,

Pure I am not.

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O wash Thou me without, within,

Or purge with fire, if that must be,–

No matter how, if only sin

Die out in me.

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Immortal, Invisible, God Only Wise   2 comments

Above:  Clouds on the Horizon

Photographer = William Henry Jackson (1843-1942)

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-det-4a16709

Text (1867; subsequently modified) by Walter Chalmers Smith (1824-1908)

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Walter Chalmers Smith altered his text.  As best as I can determine, the original six-stanza version of the hymn was as follows:

Immortal, invisible, God only wise,

In light inaccessible hid from our eyes,

Most blessed, most glorious, the Ancient of Days,

Almighty, victorious, Thy great name we praise.

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Unresting, unhasting, silent as light,

Nor striving, nor wasting, Thou rulest in might;

Thy justice like mountains soaring above

Thy clouds which are are fountains of goodness and love.

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All live thou givest–to both great and small;

In all life livest, true life of all;

Thy blossom and flourish only are we,

To wither and perish–but nought changeth thee.

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Today and tomorrow with Thee still are now;

Nor trouble, nor sorrow, nor care, Lord, hast thou;

Nor passion doth fever, nor age can decay,

The same God for ever as on yesterday.

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Great Father of glory, pure Father of light,

Thine angels adore Thee, all veiling their sight;

But of all Thy good graces this grace, Lord, impart–

Take the veil from our faces, the veil from our heart.

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All laud we would render; O help us to see,

‘Tis only the splendor of light hideth Thee;

And now let Thy glory to our gaze unroll

Through Christ in the story, and Christ in the soul.

Sources:  

The Church Hymnary–Revised Edition (1927), The Church of Scotland, The United Free Church of Scotland, The Presbyterian Church in Ireland, The Presbyterian Church of England, The Presbyterian Church of Wales, The Presbyterian Church of Australia, The Presbyterian Church of New Zealand, and The Presbyterian Church of South Africa

Moffatt, James, ed. Handbook to The Church Hymnary–Revised Edition (1927)

Stulken, Mary Kay, and Catherine Salika.  Hymnal Companion to Worship–Third Edition (1998), Roman Catholic Church

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Since The English Hymnal (1906), however, the standard version has been four stanzas long.  This has resulted from various minor changes, the omission of the original fourth stanza, the omission of the second halves of the original fifth and sixth stanzas, and the creation of a new fourth stanza from the first halves of the original fifth and sixth stanzas.

I have italicized changes from the version above.

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Immortal, invisible, God only wise,

In light accessible hid from our eyes,

Most blessed, most glorious, the Ancient of Days,

Almighty, Victorious, Thy great name we praise.

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Unresting, unhasting, and silent as light,

Nor wanting, nor wasting, Thou rulest in might;

Thy justice like mountains high soaring above

Thy clouds which are fountains of goodness and love.

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To all life Thou givest–to both great and small;

In all life Thou livest, the true life of all;

We blossom and flourish as leaves on the tree,

And wither and perish–but nought changeth Thee.

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Great Father of Glory, pure Father of Light,

Thine Angels adore Thee, all veiling their sight;

All laud we would render; O help us to see

‘Tis only the splendor of light hideth Thee.

Other Sources:

Moffatt, James, ed. Handbook to The Church Hymnary–Revised Edition (1927)

Young, Carlton R.  Companion to The United Methodist Hymnal (1993)

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Ye Fair Green Hills of Galilee   1 comment

Above:  A Crucifix

Photograph by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

Text (c. 1887) by Eustace Rogers Conder (1820-1892), for the Congregational Church Hymnal, or Hymns of Worship, Praise, and Prayer (1887), Congregational Union of England and Wales

Hymn Source = The Church Hymnary–Revised Edition (1927), several Old World Presbyterian denominations

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Ye fair green hills of Galilee,

That girdle quite Nazareth,

What glorious vision did ye see,

When He who conquered sin and death

Your flowery slopes and summits trod,

and grew in grace with man and God?

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“We saw no  glory crown His head,

As childhood ripened into youth;

No angels on His errands sped;

He wrought no sign; but meekness, truth,

And duty marked each step He trod,

And love to man, and love to God.”

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Jesus! my Saviour, Master, King,

Who didst for me the burden bear,

While saints in heaven Thy glory sing,

Let me on earth Thy likeness wear;

Mine be the path Thy feet have trod,–

Duty, and love to man and God.

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Lord of Mercy and of Might   1 comment

Christ Pantocrator Icon

Above:  Christ Pantocrator

Scan by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

Text (1811) by Reginald Heber (1783-1826)

Hymn Sources = The Church Hymnary–Revised Edition (1927), Presbyterian; and hymnary.org

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Lord of mercy and of might,

Of mankind the Life and Light,

Jesus, hear and save.

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Strong Creator, Saviour mild,

Humbled to a mortal child,

Captive, beaten, bound, reviled,

Jesus, hear and save.

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Lamb of God, for sinners slain,

Thou didst bear our grief and pain;

Cleanse us now from every stain;

Jesus, hear and save.

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Throned above celestial things,

Borne aloft on angels’ wings,

Lord of lords and King of kings,

Jesus, hear and save.

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Soon to come to earth again,

Judge of angels and of men,

Hear us now, and hear us then,

Jesus, hear and save.

By Cool Siloam’s Shady Rill   1 comment

baptismal-font

Above:  A Baptismal Font

Image in the Public Domain

Text (1812) by Reginald Heber (1783-1826)

Hymn Sources = The Church Hymnary–Revised Edition (1927), Presbyterian; and Handbook to The Church Hymnary–Revised Edition (1927)

The first line of the hymn in its original version is “By cool Siloam’s shady fountain.”  In the version published in 1827, however, “fountain” became “rill.”

Heber based the hymn on Luke 2:40 and entitled it “Christ a pattern for children.”

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By cool Siloam’s shady rill

How sweet the lily grows!

How sweet the breath, beneath the hill,

Of Sharon’s dewy rose!

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Lo! such the child whose early feet

The paths of peace have trod,

Whose secret heart with influence sweet

Is upward drawn to God.

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By cool Siloam’s shady rill

The lily must decay;

The rose that blooms beneath the hill

Must shortly fade away.

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And soon, too soon, the wintry hour

Of man’s maturer age

Will shake the soul, with sorrow’s power,

And stormy passion’s rage!

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O Thou whose infant feet were found

Within Thy Father’s shrine,

Whose years, with changeless virtue crowned,

Were all alike divine,

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Dependent on Thy bounteous breath,

We seek Thy grace alone,

In childhood, manhood, age, and death,

To keep us still Thine own.

O Lord our God, Arise!   1 comment

Map of the World 1581

Above:  Map of the World, 1581

Image Source = Library of Congress

Words (1800) by Ralph Wardlaw (1779-1858)

Hymn Source = The Church Hymnary–Revised Edition (1927), Presbyterian

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1.  O Lord our God, arise!

The cause of truth maintain,

And wide o’er all the peopled world

Extend her blessed reign.

2.  Thou Prince of Life, arise!

Nor let Thy glory cease;

Far spread the conquests of Thy grace,

And bless the earth with peace.

3.  Thou Holy Ghost, arise!

Expand Thy quickening wing,

And o’er a dark and ruined world

Let light and order spring.

4.  All on the earth, arise!

To God the Saviour sing;

From shore to shore, from earth to heaven,

Let echoing anthems ring.

My Spirit Longs for Thee   1 comment

Crucifix III July 15, 2014

Above:  One of My Crucifixes, July 15, 2015

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

Words (published in 1773) by John Byrom (1692-1763)

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The Church Hymnary–Revised Edition (1927) contains this part of the text:

My spirit longs for Thee

Within my troubled breast,

Though I unworthy be

Of so Divine a Guest.

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Of so Divine a Guest

Unworthy though I be,

Yet has my heart no rest,

Unless it come from Thee.

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Unless it come from Thee,

In vain I look around;

In all that I can see

No rest is to be found.

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No rest is to be found

But in Thy blessed love:

O let my with be crowned,

And send it from above!

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The Handbook to the Church Hymnary–Revised Edition (1927) contains the reply, which Byrom wrote in the voice of Jesus:

Cheer up, desponding soul,

Thy longing pleased I see;

‘Tis part of that great whole,

Wherewith I longed for Thee:

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Wherewith I longed for Thee,

And left my Father’s throne;

From death to set thee free,

To claim thee for my own:

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To claim thee for my own,

I suffered on the Cross:

Oh were my love but known ,

No soul could fear its loss:

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No soul could fear its loss,

But filled with love divine,

Would die on its own cross,

And rise for ever mine.

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