Archive for the ‘World War I’ Tag

Though Fatherland Be Vast and Fair   2 comments

©Photo. R.M.N. / R.-G. OjŽda

©Photo. R.M.N. / R.-G. OjŽda

Above:  Saint John on Patmos

Image in the Public Domain

Text (1918) by Allen Eastman Cross (1864-1942)

Hymn Source = American Hymns Old and New (1980)

The tune is that of “America the Beautiful.”

The context of the writing of the hymn was World War I (1914-1918), of course.

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1.  Though Fatherland be vast and fair,

Though heaven be e’er so near,

Yet there’s a land, a land, a land,

That is to God more dear.

There is no gulf, there is no sea,

And shore is touching shore,

And mountains bow and borders blend,

And hatreds are no more.

2.  So, while we face the common sun

Upon this ancient star,

And dawn and dusk swing over us,

We’ll hail our dreams afar;

We’ll greet the glory of a land

Where love shall never tire,

We’ll light a flame, a flame, a flame,

To set the world on fire.

3.  O land of lands, dear brotherland,

The country of our dream,

The home of fealty and faith,

How marvelous you seem!

Your rivers flow in shining peace,

Your trees have healing worth,

Your stones are gentleness and grace,

Your mercy fills the earth.

4.  O Christ of freedom and of faith,

O Flame of Pentecost,

Thou hast a name o’er every name

To lead the marching host,

Till wrong be bound, and peace be crowned,

And love be on a throne,

Thou hast a name, a name, a name,

To make the stars thine own.

Let There Be Light, Lord God of Hosts   Leave a comment

Europe in 1911

Above:  Map of Europe (1911)

Image in the Public Domain

Text (1908) by William Merrell Vories (1880-1964), in response to German militarism

Hymn Source = The Pilgrim Hymnal (1931/1935), General Council of Congregational and Christian Churches

Alas, warmongers never cease to exist, do they?–KRT

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1.  Let there by light, Lord God of Hosts!

Let there be wisdom on the earth!

Let broad humanity have birth!

Let there be deeds, instead of boasts!

2.  Within our passioned hearts instill

The calm that endeth strain and strife;

Make us thy messengers of life;

Purge us from lusts that curse and kill.

3.  Give us the peace of vision clear

To see our brothers’ good our own,

To joy and suffer not alone:

The love that casteth out all fear!

4.  Let woe and waste of warfare cease,

That useful labor yet may build

Its homes with love and laughter filled!

God, give thy wayward children peace!

God of the Nations, Near and Far   1 comment

World War I Memorial. Conceived by Washington architect Frederick H. Brooke in association with architects Horace W. Peaslee and Nathan C. Wyeth, the World War I Memorial commemorates the 26,000 citizens of Washington, D.C. who served in World War I. The domed peristyle Doric temple is located on the National Mall in West Potomac Park and intended to be used as a bandstand large enough to accommodate the 80-member U.S. Marine Corps Band.

World War I Memorial. Conceived by Washington architect Frederick H. Brooke in association with architects Horace W. Peaslee and Nathan C. Wyeth, the World War I Memorial commemorates the 26,000 citizens of Washington, D.C. who served in World War I. The domed peristyle Doric temple is located on the National Mall in West Potomac Park and intended to be used as a bandstand large enough to accommodate the 80-member U.S. Marine Corps Band.

Above:  World War I Memorial, Washington, D.C., 2006

Photographer = Carol M. Highsmith

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-highsm-04253

Hymn Source = The Pilgrim Hymnal (1931/1935), General Council of Congregational and Christian Churches

Text (1914) by John Haynes Holmes (1879-1964), U.S. Unitarian minister

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1.  God of the nations, near and far,

Ruler of all mankind,

Bless thou thy people as they strive

The paths of peace to find.

2.  The clash of arms still shakes the sky,

King battles still with king;

Wild thro’ the frighted air of night

The bloody tocsins ring.

3.  But clearer far the friendly speech

Of scientists and seers,

The wise debate of statesmen and

The shouts of pioneers.

4.  And stronger far the clasped hands

Of labor’s teeming throngs,

Who in a hundred tongues repeat

Their common creeds and songs.

5.  O Father! from the curse of war

We pray thee give release,

And speed, oh, speed the blessed day

Of justice, love, and peace.