Archive for the ‘St. John of Damascus’ Tag

St. John of Damascus   1 comment

st-john-of-damascus

Above:  St. John of Damascus

Image in the Public Domain

St. John of Damascus (675 or 676-749 or 754 or 780) was an influential theologian, monk, priest, orator, poet, hymn writer.  Some of his texts, in English translations, have enriched English-language hymnody, especially in Anglican traditions, since the 1800s.

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Come, Ye Faithful, Raise the Strain:

https://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2016/09/21/come-ye-faithful-raise-the-strain/

Thou Hallowed Chosen Morn of Praise:

https://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2016/09/21/thou-hallowed-chosen-morn-of-praise/

What Sweet of Life Endureth:

https://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2016/09/21/what-sweet-of-life-endureth/

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Posted September 21, 2016 by neatnik2009 in Sources JK

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What Sweet of Life Endureth   4 comments

entombment-of-christ

Above:  The Entombment of Christ

Image in the Public Domain

Original Greek Text (700s) by St. John of Damascus

English Translation John Athelstan Laurie Riley (1858-1945)

Hymn Source = The English Hymnal (1906), The Church of England

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What sweet of life endureth

Unmixed with Bitter Pain?

‘Midst earthly change and chances

What glory doth remain?

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All is a feeble shadow,

A dream that will not stay;

Death cometh in a moment,

And taketh all away.

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O Christ, a light transcendent

Shines in thy countenance,

And none can tell the sweetness,

The beauty of thy glance.

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In this may thy poor servant

His joy eternal find;

Thou calledst him, O rest him,

Thou Lover of mankind!

Thou Hallowed Chosen Morn of Praise   4 comments

icon-of-the-resurrection-ii

Above:  Icon of the Resurrection

Image in the Public Domain

Original Greek Text (700s) by St. John of Damascus

English Translation from Hymns of the Eastern Church (1862), by John Mason Neale (1818-1866)

Hymn Source = The English Hymnal (1906), The Church of England

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Thou hallowed chosen morn of praise,

That best and greatest shinest:

Lady and queen and day of days,

Of things divine, divinest!

On thee our praises Christ adore

For ever and for evermore.

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Come, let us taste the Vine’s new fruit,

For heavenly joy preparing;

To-day the branches with the Root

In Resurrection sharing:

Whom as true God our hymns adore

For ever and for evermore.

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Rise, Sion, rise! and looking forth,

Behold thy children round thee!

From east and west, from south and north,

Thy scattered sons have found thee;

And in thy bosom Christ adore

For ever and for evermore.

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O Father, O co-equal Son,

O co-eternal Spirit,

In persons Three, in substance One,

And One in power and merit;

In thee baptized, we thee adore

For ever and for evermore.

Come, Ye Faithful, Raise the Strain   4 comments

icon-of-the-resurrection

Above:  Icon of the Resurrection

Image in the Public Domain

Original Greek Text (700s) by St. John of Damascus

English Translation from Christian Remembrances (1859), by John Mason Neale (1818-1866)

Hymn Source = The English Hymnal (1906), The Church of England

The reference to Christian Remembrances comes from William Gustave Polack, The Handbook to the Lutheran Hymnal, Second Edition (1942).

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Come, ye faithful raise the strain

Of triumphant gladness;

God hath brought his Israel

Into joy from sadness;

Loosed from Pharaoh’s bitter yoke

Jacob’s sons and daughters;

Led them with unmoistened foot

Through the Red Sea waters.

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‘Tis the Spring of souls to-day;

Christ hath burst his prison,

And from three days’ sleep in death

As a Sun hath risen;

All the winter of our sins

Long and dark, is flying

From his Light, to whom we give

Laud and praise undying.

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Now the Queen of seasons, bright

With the Day of splendour,

With the royal Feast of feasts,

Comes its joy to render;

Comes to glad Jerusalem

Who with true affection

Welcomes in unwearied strains

Jesu’s Resurrection.

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Neither might the gates of death,

Nor the tomb’s dark portal,

Nor the watchers, nor the seal,

Hold thee as a mortal;

But to-day amidst the twelve

Thou didst stand, bestowing

That thy peace which evermore

Passeth human knowing.