Archive for the ‘New Worship and Song (1942)’ Tag

The Son of God, the Prince of Peace   Leave a comment

Above:  The World, 1945

Image Source = Post World War II Atlas Supplement to Hammond’s New Era Atlas of the World (1945)

Scan by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

Hymn Source = New Worship and Song (1942), Congregational Christian Churches (U.S.A.)

Words by Oscar Edward Maurer (1878-1950) and Marion Elizabeth Spencer Maurer

Oscar Edward Maurer (1878-1950), ordained a Congregationalist minister in 1906, married Marion Elizabeth Spencer the previous year.  Oscar was active in foreign missions and served as the Moderator of the Congregational Christian Churches.

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The Son of God, the Prince of Peace,

Seeks all the world to gain

For brotherhood and common good;

Who follows in his train?

Who first can curb his own desire,

And selfish pride restrain;

Who quenches hate’s unholy fire,

He follows in his train.

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All fearless souls who love their land,

But claim no better birth

Than that which makes humanity

Akin through all the earth;

Who will not seek by pow’r nor might

Another’s land to chain;

Who lose themselves to win the right:

These follow in his train.

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Make firm our courage, Prince of Peace,

Unite our will as one,

That we from striving may not cease

Until thy peace by won.

Give us thy strength to bear thy cross,

Be true, in spite of pain;

O Christ, to us may grace be given

To follow in thy train!

O Gracious God, Whose Constant Care   Leave a comment

Above:  Sunlight

Image in the Public Domain

Hymn Source = New Worship and Song (1942), Congregational Christian Churches (U.S.A.)

Text (1930), the Harry Thomas Stock (1891-1958). for a vesper service at a summer youth conference; published in The Congregationalist in the issue of February 12, 1931

Stock was a U.S. Congregationalist then (after the merger) Congregational Christian minister active in the institutional life of both denominations.  He also taught church history at Chicago Theological Seminary (1917-1922) and was deeply involved in the Christian education of young people.  Stock also received D.D. degrees from Piedmont College (1931), Knox College (1939), and Chicago Theological Seminary (1940).  From 1938 to 1958 Stock served as the General Secretary of the Division of Christian Education of the Board of Home Missions of the Congregational Christian Churches.

 This was the only hymn he wrote.

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O gracious God, whose constant care

Supplies our golden days,

Whose joyous fellowship we share

At work, at rest, in play and prayer–

Accept our heart-felt praise.

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We thank thee, Father, for each word,

Each thought, revealing truth;

For prophet voices gladly heard,

For daring dreams, for friends who stirred

The fragile wills of youth.

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Companion of our vesper hour,

Renew in us each day

Our lofty purpose, grant us power

That worthy thoughts in deeds may flower,

In Christlike lives, we pray.

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Surround us through temptation’s maze

When artful foes assail;

Help us a peaceful path to blaze,

To lead mankind in nobler ways,

Give strength–we would not fail!

Just As I Am, Thine Own To Be   1 comment

Above:  Diocesan Confirmation, The Cathedral of St. Philip, Atlanta, Georgia, April 2, 2017

Image Source = Bill Monk, Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta

Text (1887) by Marianne Hearn (1834-1909)

Hymn Source = New Worship and Song (1942), Congregational Christian Churches (U.S.A.)

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Just as I am, thine own to be,

Friend of the young, who lovest me,

To consecrate myself to thee,

O Jesus Christ, I come.

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In the glad morning of my day,

My life to give, my vows to pay,

With no reserve and no delay,

With all my heart, I come.

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I would live ever in the light,

I would work ever for the right,

I would serve thee with all my might;

Therefore, to thee, I come.

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Just as I am, strong and free,

To be the best that I can be

For truth, and righteousness, and thee,

Lord of my life, I come.

Here at Thy Table, Lord   Leave a comment

St. Stephen's, Milledgeville

Above:  St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, Milledgeville, Georgia, April 3, 2016

Image Source = Bill Monk, Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta

Text (1891) by May P. Hoyt, of whom little information has survived; the primary assumption is that she was a member of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), in whose hymnals this text has mainly appeared

Hymn Source = New Worship and Song with Worship Services and Source Materials (1942), General Council of the Congregational Christian Churches in the United States

This hymn shares a tune with “Break Thou the Bread of Life.”

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Here at thy table, Lord,

This sacred hour,

O, let us feel thee near,

In loving power,

Calling our thoughts away

From self and sin,

As to thy banquet hall

We enter in.

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Sit at the feast, dear Lord,

Break thou the bread;

Fill thou the cup that brings

Life to the dead;

That we may find in thee

Pardon and peace,

And from all bondage win

A full release.

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So shall our life of faith

Be full, be sweet,

And we shall find our strength

For each day meet;

Fed by thy living bread,

All hunger past,

We shall be satisfied

And saved at last.

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Come then, O holy Christ,

Feed us, we pray;

Touch us with thy pierced hand

Each common day,

Making this earthly life

Full of thy grace,

Till in the home of heaven

We find our place.

Posted April 5, 2016 by neatnik2009 in Eucharist 1900s

Tagged with ,

Clear O’er the Hills Ring Out   4 comments

Hills in Summer

Above:  Hills in Summer

Image in the Public Domain

Text (1929) by Ferdinand Quincy Blanchard (1876-1966)

Hymn Source = New Worship and Song with Worship Services and Source Materials (1942), General Council of the Congregational Christian Churches in the United States

I found a reference to this hymn and its source at hymnary.org.  I read the text today, after my copy of New Worship and Song arrived.

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Clear o’er the hills ring out the glad hosannas,

Bright shines the sunlight on the pilgrim throng,

Onward he rides to bear his wondrous message.

Seeking its truth the world has waited long.

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Will they accept him, finding God his Father;

Loving with strength and heart and soul and mind;

Will they accept and walk his way of service

Leading to wider joy for all mankind?

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So through all ages still he comes appealing,

Calling the sons of men from self to God,

Quickening the love that binds man to his neighbor,

Showing the path redeeming love has trod.

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Grant us, O God, the heart of full allegiance,

Teach us the secret of his gain through loss,

Fit us to build the Kingdom of thy purpose,

So to fulfill the triumph of his cross.

Saviour, Breathe an Evening Blessing   2 comments

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Above:  Night, Between 1910 and 1920

Publisher and Copyright Claimant = Detroit Publishing Company

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-D4-72241

Hymn Source (Stanzas #1 and  2) = The Church Hymnary (1927), Presbyterian

Hymn Source (Stanza #3) = New Worship and Song (1942), Congregational Christian Churches (U.S.A.)

Stanzas #1 and 2 (1820), by James Edmeston (1791-1867)

Stanza #3 (1876) by Edward Henry Bickesteth (1825-1905)

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1.  Saviour, breathe an evening blessing

Ere repose our spirits seal;

Sin and want we come confessing:

Thou canst save, and Thou canst heal.

Though destruction walk around us,

Though the arrow past us fly,

Angel guards from Thee surround us;

We are safe if Thou art nigh.

2.  Though the night be dark and dreary,

Darkness cannot hide from thee;

Thou art He who, never weary,

Watchest where Thy people be.

Should swift death this night o’ertake us,

And our couch become our tomb,

May the morn in heaven awake us,

Clad in light and deathless bloom.

3.  Father, to thy holy keeping

Humbly we ourselves resign;

Saviour, who hast kept our sleeping,

Make our slumbers pure as thine;

Blessed Spirit, brooding o’er us,

Chase the darkness of our night,

Till the perfect day before us

Breaks in everlasting light.