Archive for the ‘John Oxenham’ Tag

Dear Father, Whom We Cannot See   Leave a comment

Air Clouds

Above:  Air Clouds

Image in the Public Domain

Above:  Roderic Dunkerley (1884-1966), son of William Arthur Dunkerley (1852-1941), a.k.a. John Oxenham

Hymn Source = The Hymnal for Youth (1941), Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A.

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1.  Dear Father, whom we cannot see,

We know that Thou are near;

With longing hearts we turn to Thee,

And ask that Thou wilt set us free

From war and hate and fear.

2.  Dear Father, King of love and peace,

We know that Thou art strong;

Make conflicts everywhere to cease,

Let mercy everywhere increase,

And kindness conquer wrong.

3.  Dear Father, Lord of sea and land,

We know that Thou art wise;

O make the nations understood

That only by Thy guiding hand

Can lasting peace arise.

William Arthur Dunkerley (John Oxenham)   2 comments

Flag of England

Above:  The Flag of England

Image in the Public Domain

William Arthur Dunkerley (1852-1941) wrote fiction, non-fiction, and poetry under noms de plume, usually as “John Oxenham.”

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O God, Within Whose Sight:

https://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2014/09/17/o-god-within-whose-sight/

All Labor Gained New Dignity:

https://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2014/09/17/all-labor-gained-new-dignity/

‘Mid All the Traffic of the Ways:

https://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2014/09/17/mid-all-the-traffic-of-the-ways/

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Posted September 17, 2014 by neatnik2009 in Sources D, Sources O

Tagged with ,

O God, Within Whose Sight   2 comments

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Above:  Religious Leaders’ Luncheon, June 2014

Image Source = Bill Monk, Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta

Hymn Source = The Pilgrim Hymnal (1931/1935), U.S. Congregationalist

Words (1908) by William Arthur Dunkerley (1852-1941), who published under the nom de plume John Oxenham

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1.  O God, within whose sight

All men have equal right

To worship thee,

Break every bar that holds

Thy flock in diverse folds;

Thy will from none withholds

Full liberty.

2.  Lord, set thy churches free

From foolish rivalry.

Lord, set us free!

Let all past bitterness

Now and forever cease,

And all our souls possess

Thy charity.

All Labor Gained New Dignity   2 comments

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Above:  Carpenter’s Chisels, November 1878

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-jpd-01268

Hymn Source = The Hymnal (1941), Evangelical and Reformed Church

Words (1925) by William Arthur Dunkerley (1852-1941), who published under the nom de plume John Oxenham

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1.  All labor gained new dignity

Since He who all creation made

Toiled with His hands for daily bread

Right manfully.

2.  No work is commonplace, if all

Be done as unto Him alone;

Life’s simplest toil to Him is known,

Who knoweth all.

3.  Each smallest common thing He makes,

Serves Him with its minutest part;

Man only, with his wandering heart,

His way forsakes.

4.  His service is life’s highest joy,

It yields fair fruit a hundredfold,

Be this our prayer–“Not fame, not gold,

But Thine employ!”

‘Mid All the Traffic of the Ways   2 comments

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Above:  Traffic, Detroit, Michigan, Between 1915 and 1925

Publisher = Detroit Publishing Company

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-det-4a27913

Hymn Source = The Hymnal (1941), Evangelical and Reformed Church

Words (1917) by William Arthur Dunkerley (1852-1941), who published under the nom de plume John Oxenham

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1.  ‘Mid all the traffic of the ways

–Turmoils without, within–

Make in my heart a quiet place,

And come and dwell therein;

2.  A little shrine of quietness,

All sacred to Thyself,

Where Thou shalt all my soul possess,

And I may find myself;

3.  A little shelter from life’s stress,

Where I may lay me prone,

And bare my soul in loneliness,

And know as I am known;

4.  A little place of mystic grace,

Of self and sin swept bare,

Where I may look upon Thy face,

And walk with Thee in prayer.