Archive for the ‘John Haynes Holmes’ Tag

John Haynes Holmes   1 comment

holmes_jh

Above:  John Haynes Holmes

Image Source = Hymntime.com

John Haynes Holmes (1879-1964) was a U.S. Unitarian minister.  He, ordained in 1904, served as pastor at the Third Religious Society (Unitarian), Dorcester, Massachusetts (1904-1907), then at the Church of the Messiah (later the Community Church), New York, New York (1907-1949).  He was also an activist for peace, non-violent resistance, civil rights, civil liberties, racial equality, and Jews.  In 1930 the Jewish Institute of Religion awarded him the D.D. degree.

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The Voice of God is Calling:

https://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2015/07/24/the-voice-of-god-is-calling/

God of the Nations, Near and Far:

https://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2015/07/24/god-of-the-nations-near-and-far/

Show Us Thy Way, O God:

https://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2015/07/24/show-us-thy-way-o-god/

O’er Continent and Ocean:

https://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2015/07/24/oer-continent-and-ocean/

O God, Whose Smile is in the Sky:

https://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2015/07/24/o-god-whose-smile-is-in-the-sky/

O Father, Thou Who Givest All:

https://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2015/07/24/o-father-thou-who-givest-all/

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Posted July 24, 2015 by neatnik2009 in Sources HI

Tagged with

O Father, Thou Who Givest All   1 comment

Countryside Home

Above:  Countryside Home

Image in the Public Domain

Hymn Source = Hymns of the Spirit (1937), American Unitarian Association and Universalist Church of America

Text (1908) by John Haynes Holmes (1879-1964)

The date comes from The New Hymnal for American Youth (1930), edited by H. Augustine Smith.

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1.  O Father, thou who givest all

The bounty of thy perfect love,

We thank thee that upon us fall

Such tender blessings from above.

2.  We thank thee for the grace of home,

For mother’s love and father’s care,

For friends and teachers all who come

Our joys and hopes and fears to share.

3.  For eyes to see and ears to hear,

For hands to serve and arms to lift,

For shoulders broad and strong to bear,

For feet to run on errands swift.

4.  For faith to conquest doubt and fear,

For love to answer every call,

For strength to do, and will do dare,

We thank thee, O thou Lord of all.

O God, Whose Smile is In the Sky   2 comments

Sunset Rays in Sky

Above:  Sunset Rays on Sky

Image in the Public Domain

Hymn Source = Hymns of the Spirit (1937), American Unitarian Association and Universalist Church in America

Text (1907) by John Haynes Holmes (1879-1964)

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1.  O God, whose smile is in the sky,

Whose path is in the sea,

Once more from earth’s tumultuous strife,

We gladly turn to thee.

2.  Now all the myriad sounds of earth

In solemn stillness die;

While wind and wave unite to chant

Their anthems to the sky.

3.  We come as those with toil far spent

Who crave thy rest and peace,

And from the care and fret of life

Would find in thee release.

4.  O Father, soothe all troubled thought,

Dispel all idle fear,

Purge thou each heart of secret sin,

And banish every care;

5.  Until, as shine upon the sea

The silent stars above,

There shines upon our trusting souls

The light of thine own love.

O’er Continent and Ocean   1 comment

Ocean Beach in Sunset Palm Trees

Above:  Ocean Beach in Sunset Palm Trees

Image in the Public Domain

Text (1917) by John Haynes Holmes (1879-1964)

Hymn Source = Hymns of the Spirit (1937), American Unitarian Association and Universalist Church of America

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1.  O’er continent and ocean,

From city, field and wood,

Still speak, O Lord, thy messengers

Of peace and brotherhood.

In Athens and Benares,

In Rome and Galilee,

They fronted kings and conquerors,

And taught mankind of Thee.

2.  We hear, O Lord, these voices,

And hail them as thine own,

They speak as speak the winds and tides

On planets far and lone.

One God, the Life of Ages,

One rule, his will above,

One realm, one wide humanity,

One law, the law of love.

3.  The tribes and nations falter

In rivalries of fear;

The fires of hate to ashes turn,

To dust the sword and spear.

Thy word alone remaineth;

That word we speak again;

O’er sea and shore and continent,

To all the sons of men.

Show Us Thy Way, O God!   1 comment

Highway road with full and dotted line

Above:  A Highway

Image in the Public Domain

Text (1936) by John Haynes Holmes (1879-1964)

Hymn Source = Hymns of the Spirit (1937), American Unitarian Association and Unitarian Church of America

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1.  Show us thy way, O God!

Our feet have wandered far;

We seek the path thy saints have trod,

Where peace and beauty are.

2.  Teach us thy word, O God!

Subdue earth’s racking din;

That we may hear at home, abroad,

The still, small voice within.

3.  Tell us thy will, O God!

Our own we cannot trust.

We wait the summons of thy rod

To raise us from the dust.

4.  Thy way, thy word, thy will,

These are our surest guides

To bring us where thy Spirit still

In holiness abides.

The Voice of God is Calling   1 comment

Sunbeams Through Clouds

Above:  Sunbeams Through Clouds

Image in the Public Domain

Hymn Source = Hymns of the Spirit (1937), American Unitarian Association and Unitarian Church of America

Text (1913) by John Haynes Holmes (1879-1964)

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1.  The voice of God is calling

Its summons unto men;

As once he spake in Zion,

So now he speaks again.

Whom shall I send to succor

My people in their need?

Whom shall I send to loosen

The bonds of shame and greed?

2.  I hear my people crying

In cot and mine and slum;

No field or mart is silent,

No city street is dumb.

I see my people falling

In darkness and despair.

Whom shall I sent to shatter

The fetters which they bear?

3.  We heed, O Lord, thy summons,

And answer:  Here we are!

Send us upon thine errand!

Let us thy servants be!

Our strength is dust and ashes,

Our years a passing hour;

But thou canst use our weakness,

To magnify thy power.

4.  From ease and plenty save us,

From pride of place absolve;

Purge us of low desire,

Lift us to high resolve.

Take us, and make us holy,

Teach us thy will and way.

Speak, and behold! we answer,

Command, and we obey!

God of the Nations, Near and Far   1 comment

World War I Memorial. Conceived by Washington architect Frederick H. Brooke in association with architects Horace W. Peaslee and Nathan C. Wyeth, the World War I Memorial commemorates the 26,000 citizens of Washington, D.C. who served in World War I. The domed peristyle Doric temple is located on the National Mall in West Potomac Park and intended to be used as a bandstand large enough to accommodate the 80-member U.S. Marine Corps Band.

World War I Memorial. Conceived by Washington architect Frederick H. Brooke in association with architects Horace W. Peaslee and Nathan C. Wyeth, the World War I Memorial commemorates the 26,000 citizens of Washington, D.C. who served in World War I. The domed peristyle Doric temple is located on the National Mall in West Potomac Park and intended to be used as a bandstand large enough to accommodate the 80-member U.S. Marine Corps Band.

Above:  World War I Memorial, Washington, D.C., 2006

Photographer = Carol M. Highsmith

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-highsm-04253

Hymn Source = The Pilgrim Hymnal (1931/1935), General Council of Congregational and Christian Churches

Text (1914) by John Haynes Holmes (1879-1964), U.S. Unitarian minister

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1.  God of the nations, near and far,

Ruler of all mankind,

Bless thou thy people as they strive

The paths of peace to find.

2.  The clash of arms still shakes the sky,

King battles still with king;

Wild thro’ the frighted air of night

The bloody tocsins ring.

3.  But clearer far the friendly speech

Of scientists and seers,

The wise debate of statesmen and

The shouts of pioneers.

4.  And stronger far the clasped hands

Of labor’s teeming throngs,

Who in a hundred tongues repeat

Their common creeds and songs.

5.  O Father! from the curse of war

We pray thee give release,

And speed, oh, speed the blessed day

Of justice, love, and peace.