Archive for the ‘Catherine Winkworth’ Tag

Faith is a Living Power from Heaven   2 comments

Christ Pantocrator Icon

Above:  Icon of Christ Pantocrator

Scan by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

Original German Text (1566) by Petrus Herbert (1530-1571)

English Translation (1858) by Catherine Winkworth (1827-1878)

Hymn Source = Lyra Germanica:  The Christian Life (1858)

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Faith is a living power from heaven,

That grasps the promise God hath given,

A truth that cannot be o’erthrown,

Fix’d heartily on Christ alone.

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Faith finds in Christ whate’er we need

To save or strengthen us indeed,

Receives the grace He sends us down,

And makes us share His cross and crown.

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Faith in the conscience worketh peace,

And bids the mourner’s weeping cease;

By Faith the children’s place we claim,

And give all honour to One Name.

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Faith feels the Spirit’s kindling breath

In love and hope that conquer death;

Faith worketh hourly joy in God,

And trusts and believes e’en the rod.

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We thank Thee then, O God of heaven,

That Thou to us this faith hast given

In Jesus Christ Thy Son, Who is

Our only Fount and Source of bliss;

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And from His fullness grant each soul

The rightful faith’s true end and goal,

The blessedness no foes destroy,

Eternal love and light and joy.

Now God Be With Us, For the Night is Closing   2 comments

Dark Night

Above:  Dark Night

Image in the Public Domain

Original German Text (1566) by Petrus Herbert (1530-1571)

English Translation (1863) by Catherine Winkworth (1829-1878)

Hymn Source = Hymnal and Liturgies of the Moravian Church (Unitas Fratrum) (1923), Moravian Church in America

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Now God be with us, for the night is closing,

The light and darkness are of His disposing;

And ‘neath His shadow here to rest we yield us,

For He will shield us.

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Let evil thoughts and spirits flee before us;

Till morning cometh, watch, O Master, o’er us;

In soul and body Thou from harm defend us,

Thine angels send us.

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Let holy thoughts be ours when sleep o’ertakes us;

Our earliest thoughts be Thine when morning wakes us;

All sick and mourners, we to Thee commend them,

Do Thou befriend them.

+++++

We have no refuge, none on earth to aid us,

Save Thee, O Father, Who Thine own hast made us;

But Thy dear presence will not leave them lonely,

Who seek Thee only.

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Father, Thy Name be praised, Thy kingdom given,

Thy will be done on earth as ’tis in heaven;

Keep us in life, forgive our sins, deliver

Us now and ever.

Once He Came in Blessing   2 comments

Icon of the Nativity Andrei Rublev

Above:  Icon of the Nativity, by Andrei Rublev

Image in the Public Domain

Original Text (1540) by Jan Roh (1485/1490-1547)

English Translation (1858) by Catherine Winkworth (1829-1878)

Hymn Source #1 = Hymnal and Liturgies of the Moravian Church (Unitas Fratrum) (1923), Moravian Church in America

Hymn Source #2 = The Handbook to the Lutheran Hymnal (1942), by William Gustave Polack

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Once He came in blessing

All our ills redressing,

Came in likeness lowly,

Son of God most holy;

Bore the Cross to save us,

Hope and freedom gave us.

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Still He comes within us,

Still His voice would win us,

From the sins that hurt us;

Would to truth convert us,

From our foolish errors,

Ere He comes in terrors.

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Thus if thou hast known Him,

Not ashamed to own Him;

Nor dost love Him coldly,

But wilt trust Him boldly;

He will now receive thee,

Heal thee, and forgive thee.

+++++

But though many a trial,

Deepest self-denial,

Long and brave endurance,

Must thou win assurance

That His own makes thee,

And no more forsakes thee.

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He, who well endureth,

Bright reward secureth;

Come then, O Lord Jesus,

From our sins release us;

Let us here confess Thee,

Till in heaven we bless Thee.

Lord, On Earth I Dwell Sad-Hearted   2 comments

A King's Burden

Above:  A King’s Burden

Image in the Public Domain

Original German Text (1700) by Caspar Neumann (1648-1715)

English Translation (1863) by Catherine Winkworth (1827-1878)

Hymn Source = Evangelical Lutheran Worship (1908), Evangelical Lutheran Joint Synod of Ohio and Other States (1818-1930)

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Lord, on earth I dwell sad-hearted,

Here I oft must mourn and sigh:

Wherefore hast Thou then departed,

Why didst Thou ascend on high?

Take me, take me hence with Thee,

Or abide, Lord, still with me;

Let Thy love and gifts be left,

That I be not all bereft.

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Leave Thy heart still inly near me,

Take mine hence where Thou art gone;

Open heav’n to me, and hear me,

When to Thee I cry alone;

When I cannot pray, O plead

With the Father in my stead;

Seated now at God’s right hand,

Help us here, Thy faithful hand.

+++++

Worldly joys I cast behind me,

Let me choose the better part,

And though mortal chains yet bind me,

Heav’nward tend my thoughts and heart;

That my time through faith may be

Ordered for eternity;

Till we rise, all perils o’er,

Whither Thou hast gone before.

+++++

Then return, the promise keeping,

That was made to us of old;

Raise the members that are sleeping,

Gnaw’d of death, beneath the mould;

Judge the evil world that deems

Thy sure words but empty dreams;

And for all our sorrows past

Let us know Thy joy at last.

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When In the Hour of Utmost Need   2 comments

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Above:  Christ the Merciful

Image in the Public Domain

German Text (1547?) by Paul Eber (1511-1569)

English Translation by Catherine Winkworth (1827-1878) in Lyra Germanica:  The Christian Life (1858)

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1.  When in the hour of utmost need

We know not where to look for aid,

When days and nights of anxious thought

Nor help nor counsel yet have brought:

2.  Then this our comfort is alone,

That we may meet before Thy throne,

And cry, O faithful God, to Thee

For rescue from our misery:

3.  To Thee may raise our hearts and eyes,

Repenting sore with bitter sighs,

And seek Thy pardon for our sin,

And respite from our griefs within:

4.  For Thou hast promised graciously

To hear all those who cry to Thee,

Through Him whose Name alone is great,

Our Saviour and our Advocate.

5.  And thus we come, O God, to-day,

And all our woes before Thee lay,

For tried, forsaken, lo! we stand,

Perils and foes on every hand.

6.  Ah, hide not for our sins Thy face,

Absolve us through Thy boundless grace,

Be with us in our anguish still,

Free us at last from evil ill.

7.  That so with all our hearts we may

Once more our glad thanksgivings pay,

And walk obedient to Thy word,

And now and ever praise the Lord.

Who Knows When Death May Overtake Me   3 comments

Cemetery

Above:  Cemetery

Image in the Public Domain

Hymn Sources = The Lutheran Hymnal (1941), Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America, and William Gustave Polack, The Handbook to The Lutheran Hymnal (1942)

Original German Text (1686) by Amilie Juliane, Countess of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt (1637-1706)

Composite English Translation (1941), including contributions from Catherine Winkworth (1827-1878)

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1.  Who knows when death may overtake me!

Time passes on, my end draws near.

How swiftly can my breath forsake me!

How soon can life’s last hour appear!

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray

Thy peace may bless my dying day.

2.  The world that smiled when morn was breaking

May change for me ere the close of day

For while on earth my home I’m making

Death’s threat is never far away.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray

Thy peace my bless my dying day.

3.  My end to ponder me ever

And, ere the hour of death appears,

To cast my soul on Christ, my Savior,

Nor spare repentant sighs and tears.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray

Thy peace may bless my dying day.

4.  Help me now set my house in order

That always ready I may be

To say in meekness on death’s border:

Lord, as Thou wilt, deal Thou with me.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray

Thy peace may bless my dying day.

5.  Reveal the sweetness of Thy heaven,

Earth’s galling bitterness unfold;

May I, amid this turmoil riven,

Thy blest eternity behold.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray.

Thy peace may bless my dying day.

6.  My many sins blot out forever

Since Jesus has my pardon won;

In mercy robed, I then shall never

Fear death, but trust in Thee alone.

Thy blest eternity behold.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray.

7.  His sorrows and His cross, I know,

Make death-beds soft and light the grave,

They comfort in the hour of woe,

They give me all I fain would have.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray

Thy peace may bless my dying day.

8.  Naught shall my soul from Jesus sever;

In faith I touch His wounded side

And hail Him as my Lord forever,

Nor life nor death shall us divide.

Thy blest eternity behold.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray.

9.  Once in the blest baptismal waters

I put on Christ and made Him mine;

Now numbered with God’s sons and daughters,

I share His peace and love divine.

Thy blest eternity behold.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray.

10.  His body and His blood I’ve taken

In His blest Supper, feast divine;

Now I shall never be forsaken,

For I am His, and He is mine.

Thy blest eternity behold.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray.

11.  Then may death come today, tomorrow,

I know in Christ I perish not;

He grants the peace that stills all sorrow,

Gives me a robe without a spot.

Thy blest eternity behold.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray.

12.  And thus I live in God contented

And die without a thought of fear;

My soul has to God’s plans consented,

For through His Son my faith is clear.

Thy blest eternity behold.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray.

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Cemetery Plan 1861

Above:  Cemetery Plan 1861

Image in the Public Domain

Three stanzas in the 1863 translation by Simeon Comenius Chitty (1831-1902)

Hymn Source = Hymnal and Liturgies of the Moravian Church (Unitas Fratrum) (1923), Moravian Church in America

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1.  The solemn moment is impending,

When my career shall end in death,

My course unto the grave is ending,

And soon may come my latest breath;

My God and Saviour, hear my prayer,

Me for my dying hour prepare.

2.  So teach me, Lord, my days to number

That I may wisdom’s path pursue;

That nothing may my soul encumber,

Oh, let me keep the Cross in view;

My God and Saviour, hear my prayer,

Me for my dying hour prepare.

3.  To-day let death come, or to-morrow,

I know that I in Jesus live;

Thee will I serve through joy and sorrow,

The robe of righteousness I have;

My God and Saviour, hear my prayer,

Me for my dying hour prepare.

Now Lay We Calmly in the Grave   3 comments

Cemetery

Above:  A Cemetery, Between 1904 and 1920

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-det-4a28669

Original Czech Text (1519) by Luke of Prague (1458-1528)

German Translation (1531) by Michael Weisse (1480-1534)

English Translation (1858) by Catherine Winkworth (1827-1878)

Hymn Source = Hymnal and Liturgies of the Moravian Church (Unitas Fratrum) (1923), Moravian Church in America

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1.  Now lay we calmly in the grave

This form, whereof no doubt we have

That it shall rise again that day

In glorious triumph o’er decay.

2.  His soul is living now in God,

Whose grace His pardon hath bestowed,

Who through His Son redeemed him here

From bondage unto sin and fear.

3.  Then let us leave him to his rest,

And homeward turn, for he is blest.

And we must well our souls prepare,

When death shall come, to meet him there.

4.  So help us, Christ, our Hope in loss;

Thou hast redeemed us by Thy Cross

From endless death and misery;

We praise, we bless, we worship Thee.

Lord Jesus Christ, My Life, My Light   3 comments

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Above:  Christ the Merciful

Image in the Public Domain

Hymn Source = The Lutheran Hymnary (1935), Norwegian Lutheran Church of America/The Evangelical Lutheran Church

Original German Words (1610) by Martin Behm (1557-1622)

English Translation (1858) by Catherine Winkworth (1827-1878)

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1.  Lord Jesus Christ, my life, my light,

My strength by day, my trust by night,

On earth I’m but a passing guest,

And sorely with my sins oppressed.

2.  Far off I see my fatherland,

Where through Thy grace I hope to stand,

But ere I reach that paradise,

A weary way before me lies.

3.  My heart sinks at the journey’s length,

My wasted flesh has little strength,

Only my soul still cries in me,

Lord, fetch me home, take me to Thee!

4.  O let Thy sufferings give me power

To meet the last and darkest hour;

Thy cross the staff whereon I lean,

My couch the grace where Thou hast been.

5.  Since Thou hast died, the pure, the just,

I take my homeward way in trust,

The gates of heaven, Lord, open wide,

When here I may no more abide.

6.  And when the last great day is come,

And Thou, our Judge, shalt speak the doom,

Let me with joy behold the light,

And set me then upon Thy right.

7.  Renew this wasted flesh of mine,

That like the sun it there may shine,

Among the angels pure and bright,

Yea, like Thyself in glorious light.

8.  Ah, then I have my heart’s desire,

When singing with the angels’ choir,

Among the ransomed of Thy grace,

For ever I behold Thy face!

O Jesus, King of Glory   3 comments

Christ Pantocrator

Above:  Christ Pantocrator

Image in the Public Domain

Hymn Source = American Lutheran Hymnal (1930), American Lutheran Church (1930-1960) and its immediate predecessor bodies

Original German Words (1606) by Martin Behm (1557-1622)

English Translation (1863) by Catherine Winkworth (1827-1878)

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1.  O Jesus, King of glory!

Both David’s God and Son,

Thy realm endures forever,

In heav’n is fixed Thy throne:

Help that in earth’s dominions,

Throughout, from pole to pole,

Thy realm may spread salvation

To each benighted soul.

2.  The Eastern sages, bringing

Their tribute gifts to Thee,

Bear witness to Thy kingdom

And humbly bow the knee.

The Eastern star proclaims Thee,

As doth the inspired Word;

Hence joyously we hail Thee:

Our blest Redeemer, Lord!

3.  Thou art a mighty Monarch,

As by the Word we’re told,

Yet carest Thou but little

For earthly goods or gold;

On no proud steed Thou ridest,

Thou wear’st no jeweled crown,

Nor dwell’st in lordly castle,

But bearest scoff and frown.

4.  Yet art Thou decked with beauty,

With rays of glorious light;

Thou ever teem’st with goodness,

And all Thy ways are right.

Vouchsafe to shield Thy people

With Thine almighty arm,

That they may dwell in safety

From those who mean bu harm.

5.  Ah, look on me with pity,

Though I am weak and poor;

Admit me to Thy kingdom,

To dwell there, blest and sure.

Vouchsafe to keep and guide me

Secure from all my foes,

From sin, and death and Satan;

Free me from all my woes.

6.  And bid Thy Word within me

Shine as the fairest star;

Keep sin and all false doctrine

From all Thy people far;

Help us confess Thee truly,

And with Thy Christendom

Here own Thee King and Savior

And in the world to come.

Spread, Oh, Spread, Thou Mighty Word   3 comments

Polar Projection 1951 Alpha

Polar Projection 1951 Beta

Above:  Polar Projection of the World from Hammond’s Complete World Atlas (1951)

Scans by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

Original German Words (1827) by Jonathan Friedrich Bahnmaier (1774-1841)

English Translation (1858) by Catherine Winkworth (1827-1878)

Hymn Source = Lyra Germanica, Second Series (1858)

I have changed some instances of the letter “f” to “s” to remain consistent with current English.

There are some subtle differences between this version and the more familiar and altered and abbreviated one.

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1.  Spread, oh, spread, thou mighty Word,

Spread the kingdom of the Lord,

Wheresoe’er His breath has given

Life to beings meant for heaven.

2.  Tell them how the Father’s will

Made the world, and keeps it still,

How He sent His Son to save

All who help and comfort crave.

3.  Tell of our Redeemer’s love,

Who for ever doth remove

By His holy sacrifice,

All the guilt that on us lies.

4.  Tell them of the Spirit given

Now, to guide us up to heaven,

Strong and holy, just and true,

Working both to will and do.

5.  Word of Life!  most pure and strong,

Lo! for Thee the nations long;

Spread, till from its dreary night

All the world awakes to light.

6.  Up, the ripening fields ye see,

Mighty shall the harvest be,

But the reapers still are few,

Great the work they have to do.

7.  Lord of harvest, let there be

Joy and strength to work for Thee,

Let the nations far and near

See Thy Light, and learn Thy fear.