Archive for the ‘The Presbyterian Hymnal (1990)’ Category

The Lone, Wild Fowl/The Lone, Wild Bird   Leave a comment

Seagull Flying

Above:  A Seagull Flying

Image in the Public Domain

Text (1925; published in 1926) by Henry Richard McFayden (sometimes listed as MacFayden) (1877-1964), a Presbyterian minister in North Carolina

Hymn Source = The New Hymnal for American Youth (1930)

The New Hymnal for American Youth (1930) lists then hymn as “The Lone, Wild Fowl in Lofty Flight,” yet the more common title in hymnals has become “The Lone, Wild Bird.”  I found a two-verse version (as “The Lone, Wild Bird” and with the archaic pronouns preserved) in The Presbyterian Hymnal:  Hymns, Psalms, and Spiritual Songs (Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), 1990) and in Singing the Living Tradition (Unitarian Universalist Association, 1993).  The Faith We Sing (The United Methodist Church, 2000) and its nearly identical Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) counterpart, Sing the Faith (2003), include a five-stanza version, with the first three stanzas (altered, mostly to update pronouns) credited to McFayden and stanzas 4 and 5 credited to Marty Haugen (1950-), composer of much annoying contemporary church music especially popular in the post-Vatican II Roman Catholic Church, although he is a Protestant (raised a Lutheran and now a member of the United Church of Christ).  The Second Vatican Council did wonders for theology, but church music suffered afterward.

McFayden composed the text on a Sunday afternoon in 1925 and entered it into a hymn-writing contest The Homiletic and Pastoral Review sponsored.  The hymn won third place.

The version of the hymn from The New Hymnal for American Youth (1930) is the oldest I have located.

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1.  The lone, wild fowl in lofty flight

Is still with thee nor leaves thy sight.

And I am thine! I rest in thee.

Great Spirit, come, and rest in me.

2.  The ends of earth are in thy hand,

The sea’s dark deep and no man’s land.

And I am thine! I rest in thee.

Great Spirit, come, and rest in me.

Near to the Heart of God   Leave a comment

Christ Blessing--Nardo di Cione

Above:  Christ Blessing, by Nardo di Cione

Image in the Public Domain

Text (1901) by Cleland Boyd McAfee (1866-1944), a minister of the former Presbyterian Church in the United States (1861-1983), after two nieces died concurrently of diphtheria

Hymn Source = The Presbyterian Hymnal:  Hymns, Psalms, and Spiritual Songs (1990), Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

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1.  There is a place of quiet rest,

Near to the heart of God,

A place where no sin can molest,

Near to the heart of God.

O Jesus, blest Redeemer,

Sent from the heart of God,

Hold us, who wait before Thee,

Near to the heart of God.

2.  There is a place of comfort sweet,

Near to the heart of God,

A place where we our Savior meet,

Near to the heart of God.

O Jesus, blest Redeemer,

Sent from the heart of God,

Hold us, who wait before Thee,

Near to the heart of God.

3.  There is a place of full release,

Near to the heart of God,

A place where all is joy and peace,

Near to the heart of God.

O Jesus, blest Redeemer,

Sent from the heart of God,

Hold us, who wait before Thee,

Near to the heart of God.

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This is post #1550 of GATHERED PRAYERS.

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The World Abounds with God’s Free Grace   Leave a comment

Cloud Over a Mountain

Above:  Cloud Over a Mountain

Image in the Public Domain

Text (1980; copyright, 1990), by David G. Mehrtens (October 18, 1930-January 11, 2010), a chemist and a Missouri Synod Lutheran

Hymn Source = The Presbyterian Hymnal:  Hymns, Psalms, and Spiritual Songs (1990), Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

The hymn is absent from Glory to God:  The Presbyterian Hymnal (2013), Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).  Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod resources, such as Hymnal Supplement 98 (1998) and the Lutheran Service Book (2006), also lack this text.

This hymn seems especially appropriate in the vicinity of the Feast of St. Francis of Assisi (October 4).

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1.  The world abounds with God’s free grace;

What wonders bless the land!

And on through boundless starry space,

God’s matchless works expand.

Lord, teach us an attitude that thanks You all our days,

A love that shows our gratitude through deeds that live our praise.

2.  Give thanks for plains and valleys spaced

By mountains thrusting high;

Give thanks by fighting greed and waste

That drain their treasures dry.

Lord, teach us an attitude that thanks You all our days,

A love that shows our gratitude through deeds that live our praise.

3.  In full thanksgiving for God’s love,

From which earth’s blessings flow,

Protect the precious air above,

The waters spread below.

Lord, teach us an attitude that thanks You all our days,

A love that shows our gratitude through deeds that live our praise.

4.  Give thanks in hope, rejoice, repent,

And practice all you prayed;

True thanks can never be content

To foul the world God made.

Lord, teach us an attitude that thanks You all our days,

A love that shows our gratitude through deeds that live our praise.

All Things Bright and Beautiful   1 comment

A Young Kitten

Image Source = Wikipedia

Cats, of course, are the greatest creatures on four legs.

Hymn Source = The Presbyterian Hymnal:  Hymns, Psalms, and Spiritual Songs (1990), of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

Words by Cecil Frances Alexander (1818-1895), wife of William Alexander, a priest then the Bishop of Derry then the Archbishop of Armagh, Church of Ireland

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Refrain:

All things bright and beautiful,

All creatures great and small,

All things wise and wonderful:

The Lord God made them all.

Verses:

1. Each little flower that opens,

Each little bird that sings:

God made their glowing colors,

God made their tiny wings.

2.  The purple-headed mountain,

The river running by,

The sunset, and the morning

That brightens up the sky.

3.  The cold wind in the winter,

The pleasant summer sun,

The ripe fruits in the garden:

God made them every one.

4.  God gave us eyes to see them,

And lips that we might tell

How great is God Almighty,

Who has done all things well.

Help Us Accept Each Other   1 comment

Above:  Statue of Reconciliation, Coventry Cathedral

Image Source = Rebecca Kennison

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:UK_Coventry_Statue-of-Reconcilliation.jpg)

Hymn Source = The Presbyterian Hymnal:  Hymns, Psalms, and Spiritual Songs (1990), of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

Words by the Reverend Fred Kaan (1929-2009), of the United Reformed Church, a Presbyterian-Congregationalist denomination in the United Kingdom

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1.  Help us accept each other

As Christ accepted us;

Teach us as sister, brother,

Each person to embrace.

Be present, Lord, among us

And bring us to believe

We are ourselves accepted

and meant to love and live.

2.  Teach us, O Lord, Your lessons,

As in our daily life

We struggle to be human

And search for hope and faith.

Teach us to care for people,

For all, not just for some,

To love them as we find them

Or as they may become.

3.  Let Your acceptance change us,

So that we may be moved

In living situations

To do the truth in love;

To practice Your acceptance

Until we know by heart

The table of forgiveness

And laughter’s healing art.

4.  Lord, for today’s encounters

With all who are in need,

Who hunger for acceptance,

For righteousness and bread,

We need new eyes for seeing,

New hands for holding on:

Renew us with Your Spirit;

Lord, free us, make us one!

The Heavens Above Declare God’s Praise   1 comment

Flame Nebula

Image Source = Wikipedia

Hymn Source = The Presbyterian Hymnal:  Hymns, Psalms, and Spiritual Songs (1990), of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

Christopher L. Webber, an Episcopal priest, wrote this text, based on Psalm 19:1-6, in 1986.

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1.  The heavens above declare God’s praise,

The work God’s hands have made;

Day after day the tale is told,

And night by night displayed.

2.  There is no utterance or speech,

No voice has ever heard,

Yet to all nations comes the sound,

To every place their word.

3.  Forth like a bridegrom comes the sun

From its appointed place,

And like a hero runs its course,

Rejoicing in the race.

4.  It runs from east to farthest west

To make its course complete,

And nothing in the world beneath

Escapes in scorching heat.

Lord, Who May Dwell Within Your House   1 comment

Washington National Cathedral at Twilight

Image Source = Wikipedia

Hymn Source = The Presbyterian Hymnal: Hymns, Psalms, and Spiritual Songs (1990), of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

The Reverend Christopher L. Webber, author of the following words (which date to 1986), is an Episcopal priest.  Psalm 15 is the basis for the text.

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1.  Lord, who may dwell within your house

Or on Your holy hill?

Those who do good and speak the truth,

Whose lives are blameless still.

2.  Who have no guile upon their tongues

Nor harm their neighbor’s life,

But honor those who fear the Lord

And turn away from strife.

3.  Who do no wrong, but keep their word

And seek no bribe or gain;

All those who do such things shall live

And safe from harm remain.