Archive for the ‘Praise of God/Seeking God 1600s’ Category

Heaven and Earth, and Sea and Sky   1 comment

Above:  Mountain and Sky, Utah

Image in the Public Domain

Original German Text (1680) by Joachim Neander (1650-1680)

Composite English Translation

Hymn Source = Common Service Book of the Lutheran Church (1917), The United Lutheran Church in America (1918-1962) and its immediate predecessor bodies

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Heaven and earth, and sea and air,

All their Maker’s praise declare;

Wake, my soul, awake and sing:

Now thy grateful praises bring.

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See the glorious orb of day

Breaking through the clouds his way;

Moon and stares with silvery light

Praise Him through the silent night.

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See how He hath ev’ry where

Made this earth so rich and fair;

Hill and vale and fruitful land,

All things living, show His hand.

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See how through the boundless sky

Fresh and free the birds do fly;

Fire and wind and storm are still

Servants of His royal will.

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See the water’s ceaseless flow,

Ever circling to and fro;

From the sources to the sea,

Still it rolls in praise to Thee.

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Lord, great wonders workest Thou!

To Thy sway all creatures bow.

Write Thou deeply in my heart

What I am, and what Thou art!

Wondrous King, All-Glorious   1 comment

Above:  Clouds

Image in the Public Domain

Original German Text (1680) by Joachim Neander (1650-1680)

English Translation (1938) by William John Schaefer (1891-1976)

Hymn Source = The Lutheran Hymnal (1941), The Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America

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Wondrous King, all-glorious,

Sov’reign Lord victorious,

Oh, receive our praise with favor!

From Thee welled God’s kindness

Tho’ we in our blindness

Strayed from Thee, our blessed Savior.

Strengthen Thou,

Help us now;

Let our tongues be singing,

Thee our praises bringing.

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Heavens, spread the story

Of our Maker’s glory,

All the pomp of earth obscuring,

Sun, thy rays be sending,

Thy bright beams expending,

Light to all the earth assuring.

Moon and star,

Praise afar

Him who glorious made you;

The vast heavens aid you.

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O my soul, rejoicing,

Sing, thy praises voicing,

Sing, with hymns of faith adore Him!

All who here have being,

Shout, your voices freeing,

Bow down in the dust before Him.

He is God Sabaoth;

Praise alone the Savior,

Here and there forever.

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Hallelujahs render

To the Lord most tender,

Te who know and love the Savior.

Hallelujahs sing ye,

Ye redeemed, oh, bring ye

Hearts that yield Him glad behavior.

Blest are ye

Endlessly;

Sinless there forever,

Ye shall laud Him ever.

O Holy Spirit, Grant Us Grace   1 comment

Pentecost Dove May 24, 2015

Above:  Pentecost Dove

Scan by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

Original Text (1591) by Bartholomaus Ringwaldt (1532-1599)

Translation #1 (1693) by Soren Jonasson

Translation #2 (1909) by Oluf Hanson Smeby (1851-1929)

Hymn Source = The Concordia Hymnal:  A Hymnal for Church, School and Home (1932), U.S. Norwegian Lutherans

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1.  O Holy Spirit, grant us grace

That we our Lord and Saviour

In faith and fervent love embrace,

And truly serve Him ever,

So that when death is drawing nigh,

We to His open wounds may fly,

And find in them salvation.

2.  Help us that we Thy saving word

In faithful hearts may treasure;

Let e’er that bread of life afford

New grace in richest measure;

Yea, let us die to ev’ry sin,

For heav’n create us new within,

That fruits of faith may flourish.

3.  And when our earthly race is run,

Death’s bitter hour impending,

Then may Thy work, in us begun,

Continue till life’s ending;

Until we gladly may commend

Our souls into our Savior’s hand,

To rest in peace eternal.

Who Knows When Death May Overtake Me   3 comments

Cemetery

Above:  Cemetery

Image in the Public Domain

Hymn Sources = The Lutheran Hymnal (1941), Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America, and William Gustave Polack, The Handbook to The Lutheran Hymnal (1942)

Original German Text (1686) by Amilie Juliane, Countess of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt (1637-1706)

Composite English Translation (1941), including contributions from Catherine Winkworth (1827-1878)

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1.  Who knows when death may overtake me!

Time passes on, my end draws near.

How swiftly can my breath forsake me!

How soon can life’s last hour appear!

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray

Thy peace may bless my dying day.

2.  The world that smiled when morn was breaking

May change for me ere the close of day

For while on earth my home I’m making

Death’s threat is never far away.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray

Thy peace my bless my dying day.

3.  My end to ponder me ever

And, ere the hour of death appears,

To cast my soul on Christ, my Savior,

Nor spare repentant sighs and tears.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray

Thy peace may bless my dying day.

4.  Help me now set my house in order

That always ready I may be

To say in meekness on death’s border:

Lord, as Thou wilt, deal Thou with me.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray

Thy peace may bless my dying day.

5.  Reveal the sweetness of Thy heaven,

Earth’s galling bitterness unfold;

May I, amid this turmoil riven,

Thy blest eternity behold.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray.

Thy peace may bless my dying day.

6.  My many sins blot out forever

Since Jesus has my pardon won;

In mercy robed, I then shall never

Fear death, but trust in Thee alone.

Thy blest eternity behold.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray.

7.  His sorrows and His cross, I know,

Make death-beds soft and light the grave,

They comfort in the hour of woe,

They give me all I fain would have.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray

Thy peace may bless my dying day.

8.  Naught shall my soul from Jesus sever;

In faith I touch His wounded side

And hail Him as my Lord forever,

Nor life nor death shall us divide.

Thy blest eternity behold.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray.

9.  Once in the blest baptismal waters

I put on Christ and made Him mine;

Now numbered with God’s sons and daughters,

I share His peace and love divine.

Thy blest eternity behold.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray.

10.  His body and His blood I’ve taken

In His blest Supper, feast divine;

Now I shall never be forsaken,

For I am His, and He is mine.

Thy blest eternity behold.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray.

11.  Then may death come today, tomorrow,

I know in Christ I perish not;

He grants the peace that stills all sorrow,

Gives me a robe without a spot.

Thy blest eternity behold.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray.

12.  And thus I live in God contented

And die without a thought of fear;

My soul has to God’s plans consented,

For through His Son my faith is clear.

Thy blest eternity behold.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray.

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Cemetery Plan 1861

Above:  Cemetery Plan 1861

Image in the Public Domain

Three stanzas in the 1863 translation by Simeon Comenius Chitty (1831-1902)

Hymn Source = Hymnal and Liturgies of the Moravian Church (Unitas Fratrum) (1923), Moravian Church in America

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1.  The solemn moment is impending,

When my career shall end in death,

My course unto the grave is ending,

And soon may come my latest breath;

My God and Saviour, hear my prayer,

Me for my dying hour prepare.

2.  So teach me, Lord, my days to number

That I may wisdom’s path pursue;

That nothing may my soul encumber,

Oh, let me keep the Cross in view;

My God and Saviour, hear my prayer,

Me for my dying hour prepare.

3.  To-day let death come, or to-morrow,

I know that I in Jesus live;

Thee will I serve through joy and sorrow,

The robe of righteousness I have;

My God and Saviour, hear my prayer,

Me for my dying hour prepare.

The Lord Hath Helped Me Hitherto   2 comments

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Above:  Christ the Merciful

Image in the Public Domain

Hymn Source = The Lutheran Hymnal (1941), Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America

Original German Text (1699) by Amilie Juliane, Countess of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt (1637-1706)

English Translation (1882) by August Crull (1845-1923)

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1.  The Lord hath helped me hitherto

By His surpassing favor;

His mercies ev’ry morn were new,

His kindness did not water.

God hitherto hath been my Guide,

Hath pleasures hitherto supplied,

And hitherto hath helped me.

2.  I praise and thank Thee, Lord, my God,

For Thine abundant blessing

Where here-to-fore Thou hast bestowed

And I am still possessing.

Inscribe this on my memory:

The Lord hath done great things for me

And graciously hath helped me.

3.  Help me henceforth, O God of grace,

Help me on each occasion,

Help me in each and every place,

Help me thro’ Jesus’ Passion:

Help me in life and death, O God,

Help me thro’ Jesus’ dying blood’

Help me as Thou hast helped me!

As We Begin Another Week   1 comment

St. Catherine's, Marietta

Above:  St. Catherine’s Episcopal Church, Marietta, Georgia, May 17, 2015

Image Source = Bill Monk, Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta

Original Words (published in 1697) by Martin Wandersleben (1608-1668)

English Translation (1940) by William Gustave Polack (1890-1950)

Hymn Source = The Lutheran Hymnal (1941), Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America

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1.  As we begin another week,

In Jesus’ name this boon we seek:

God, grant that thro’ these seven days

No evil may befall our ways.

2.  Thy gentle blessings, Lord, outpour

On all our labor evermore;

Our hearts with Thy good Spirit fill

That we may gladly do Thy will.

3.  In every season, every place

May we regard Thy Word of grace

Until, when life’s brief day is past

We reach eternal joy at last.

4.  And keep with angels in Thy rest

The endless Sabbaths of the blest.

This grant to us through Christ, Thy Son,

Who reigns with Thee upon Thy throne.

Friend of the Weary, O Refresh Us   1 comment

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Above:  Christ the Merciful

Image in the Public Domain

Hymn Source = Common Service Book of the Lutheran Church (1917), United Lutheran Church in America (1918-1962) and its immediate predecessors

Original German Text by Ludwig Andreas Gotter (1661-1735)

English Translation (1914, 1917) by John Caspar Mattes (1876-1948)

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1.  Friend of the weary, O refresh us,

And turn to us Thy loving face,

With Thy sweet peace and pardon bless us,

That sin may be destroyed by grace;

O come, Thy sweet compassion showing,

On our poor souls Thy grace bestowing.

2.  From Thee our only comfort cometh,

Our strength and hope, O Lord of all;

To Thee all power still belongeth

To save and help us in each fall;

Thy grace and pardon will deliver,

And set us free from shame forever.

3.  And Thou did’st help the sick and weary,

Who once were gathered at Thy side,

‘Mid earthly deserts, waste and dreary,

In Thy sure aid we still confide;

When evils come, our souls assailing,

Send us Thy Word of grace unfailing.