Archive for the ‘The Lutheran Hymnal (1941)’ Category

Let Songs of Praises Fill the Sky   2 comments

Pentecost Dove May 24, 2015

Above:  Pentecost Dove, Bulletin, Pentecost Sunday 2015, St. Gregory the Great Episcopal Church, Athens, Georgia

Scanned by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

Hymn Source = The Lutheran Hymnal (1941), Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America

Text (1819) by Thomas Cotterill (1779-1823)

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

1.  Let songs of praises fill the sky:

Christ, our ascended Lord,

Sends down His Spirit from on high

According to His word.

All hail the day of Pentecost,

The coming of the Holy Ghost!

2.  The Spirit by His heavenly breath

Creates new life within;

He quickens sinners from the death

Of trespasses and sin.

All hail the day of Pentecost,

The coming of the Holy Ghost!

3.  The things of Christ the Spirit takes

And shows them unto men;

The fallen soul His temple makes,

God’s image stamps again.

All hail the day of Pentecost,

The coming of the Holy Ghost!

4.  Come, Holy Spirit, from above

With Thy celestial fire;

Come and with flames of zeal and love

Our hearts and tongues inspire.

All hail the day of Pentecost,

The coming of the Holy Ghost!

The Morning Sun is Brightly Beaming   Leave a comment

Lake Rocks in Morning Mist

Above:  Lake Rocks in Morning Mist

Image in the Public Domain

Hymn Source = The Lutheran Hymnal (1941), Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America

Anonymous Finnish Text (published in 1836)

English Translation (1938) by Gustav Adolf Aho (1897-1973)

Gustav Adolf Aho, born in Sebeka, Minnesota, on October 9, 1897, to Jacob Aho and Wilhelmiina “Mina” Juuti Aho, became a minister of the former Finnish Evangelical Lutheran National Church of America (1898-1964; renamed the National Evangelical Lutheran Church from 1946 to 1964) in 1921.  He served as pastor of Bethlehem Lutheran Church, Jersey City, New Jersey (1921-1926); First Lutheran Church, Ely, Minnesota (1926-1934); and the Lutheran National Churches in Ashtabula and Fairport Harbor, Ohio (1934-?).  Later he served churches in New York and Ontario.  From 1928 to 1931 he was the Secretary of the FELNCA.  Then, from 1931 to 1953, he was the President of the FELNCA/NELC.  The NELC merged into The Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod in 1964.  Aho’s last position was as chaplain at the East Ridge Retirement Village, Miami, Florida (1968-1972).  He died on December 27, 1973.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

1.  The morning sun is brightly beaming,

And darkness deep has passed away;

All earth with life and joy is teeming

In beauty of a new-born day.

O gracious Father, purest Light,

Thou bringest day, dispellest night.

2.  Grant unto me in tender mercies

Thy Holy Spirit’s saving light;

The entrance of Thy Word disperses

From out of my mind its sinful night.

My poor and erring heart instill

With love to do Thy gracious will.

3.  Dear Jesus, send Thy mercies o’er me

Like morning dews to cleanse my soul.

Oh, may Thy holy blood restore me.

Let me be strengthened by Thy might

To walk in Thy eternal light.

Send Thou, O Lord, To Ev’ry Place   1 comment

World Map 1493

Above:  World Map, 1493

Image in the Public Domain

Hymn Source = The Lutheran Hymnal (1941), Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America

Text (1888) by Mary Cornelia Bishop Gates (1842-1905)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

1.  Send Thou, O Lord, to ev’ry place

Swift messengers before Thy face,

The heralds of Thy wondrous grace,

Where Thou Thyself wilt come.

2.  Send men whose eyes have seen the King,

Men in whose ears His sweet words ring;

Send such Thy lost ones home to bring;

Send them where Thou wilt come,–

3.  To bring good news to souls in sin,

The bruised and broken hearts to win;

In ev’ry place to bring them in

Where Thou Thyself wilt come.

4.  Thou who hast died,

Thy vict’ry claim;

Assert, O Christ, Thy glory’s name

And far to lands to pagan shame

Send men where Thou wilt come.

5.  Gird each one with the Spirit’s Sword,

The sword of Thine own deathless Word,

And make them conquerors, conquering Lord,

Where Thou Thyself wilt come.

6.  Raise up, O Lord, the Holy Ghost,

From this broad land a mighty host;

Their war cry, “We will seek the lost

Where Thou, O Christ, wilt come.”

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

This is post #1500 of GATHERED PRAYERS.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Who Knows When Death May Overtake Me   3 comments

Cemetery

Above:  Cemetery

Image in the Public Domain

Hymn Sources = The Lutheran Hymnal (1941), Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America, and William Gustave Polack, The Handbook to The Lutheran Hymnal (1942)

Original German Text (1686) by Amilie Juliane, Countess of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt (1637-1706)

Composite English Translation (1941), including contributions from Catherine Winkworth (1827-1878)

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

1.  Who knows when death may overtake me!

Time passes on, my end draws near.

How swiftly can my breath forsake me!

How soon can life’s last hour appear!

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray

Thy peace may bless my dying day.

2.  The world that smiled when morn was breaking

May change for me ere the close of day

For while on earth my home I’m making

Death’s threat is never far away.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray

Thy peace my bless my dying day.

3.  My end to ponder me ever

And, ere the hour of death appears,

To cast my soul on Christ, my Savior,

Nor spare repentant sighs and tears.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray

Thy peace may bless my dying day.

4.  Help me now set my house in order

That always ready I may be

To say in meekness on death’s border:

Lord, as Thou wilt, deal Thou with me.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray

Thy peace may bless my dying day.

5.  Reveal the sweetness of Thy heaven,

Earth’s galling bitterness unfold;

May I, amid this turmoil riven,

Thy blest eternity behold.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray.

Thy peace may bless my dying day.

6.  My many sins blot out forever

Since Jesus has my pardon won;

In mercy robed, I then shall never

Fear death, but trust in Thee alone.

Thy blest eternity behold.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray.

7.  His sorrows and His cross, I know,

Make death-beds soft and light the grave,

They comfort in the hour of woe,

They give me all I fain would have.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray

Thy peace may bless my dying day.

8.  Naught shall my soul from Jesus sever;

In faith I touch His wounded side

And hail Him as my Lord forever,

Nor life nor death shall us divide.

Thy blest eternity behold.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray.

9.  Once in the blest baptismal waters

I put on Christ and made Him mine;

Now numbered with God’s sons and daughters,

I share His peace and love divine.

Thy blest eternity behold.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray.

10.  His body and His blood I’ve taken

In His blest Supper, feast divine;

Now I shall never be forsaken,

For I am His, and He is mine.

Thy blest eternity behold.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray.

11.  Then may death come today, tomorrow,

I know in Christ I perish not;

He grants the peace that stills all sorrow,

Gives me a robe without a spot.

Thy blest eternity behold.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray.

12.  And thus I live in God contented

And die without a thought of fear;

My soul has to God’s plans consented,

For through His Son my faith is clear.

Thy blest eternity behold.

My God, for Jesus’ sake I pray.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Cemetery Plan 1861

Above:  Cemetery Plan 1861

Image in the Public Domain

Three stanzas in the 1863 translation by Simeon Comenius Chitty (1831-1902)

Hymn Source = Hymnal and Liturgies of the Moravian Church (Unitas Fratrum) (1923), Moravian Church in America

+++++++++

1.  The solemn moment is impending,

When my career shall end in death,

My course unto the grave is ending,

And soon may come my latest breath;

My God and Saviour, hear my prayer,

Me for my dying hour prepare.

2.  So teach me, Lord, my days to number

That I may wisdom’s path pursue;

That nothing may my soul encumber,

Oh, let me keep the Cross in view;

My God and Saviour, hear my prayer,

Me for my dying hour prepare.

3.  To-day let death come, or to-morrow,

I know that I in Jesus live;

Thee will I serve through joy and sorrow,

The robe of righteousness I have;

My God and Saviour, hear my prayer,

Me for my dying hour prepare.

The Lord Hath Helped Me Hitherto   2 comments

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Above:  Christ the Merciful

Image in the Public Domain

Hymn Source = The Lutheran Hymnal (1941), Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America

Original German Text (1699) by Amilie Juliane, Countess of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt (1637-1706)

English Translation (1882) by August Crull (1845-1923)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

1.  The Lord hath helped me hitherto

By His surpassing favor;

His mercies ev’ry morn were new,

His kindness did not water.

God hitherto hath been my Guide,

Hath pleasures hitherto supplied,

And hitherto hath helped me.

2.  I praise and thank Thee, Lord, my God,

For Thine abundant blessing

Where here-to-fore Thou hast bestowed

And I am still possessing.

Inscribe this on my memory:

The Lord hath done great things for me

And graciously hath helped me.

3.  Help me henceforth, O God of grace,

Help me on each occasion,

Help me in each and every place,

Help me thro’ Jesus’ Passion:

Help me in life and death, O God,

Help me thro’ Jesus’ dying blood’

Help me as Thou hast helped me!

The Savior Kindly Calls   1 comment

St. Catherine's Church

Above:  St. Catherine’s Episcopal Church, Marietta, Georgia, May 17, 2015

Image Source = Bill Monk, Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta

Hymn Source = The Lutheran Hymnal (1941), Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America

Words (1826) by Henry Ustick Onderdonk (1789-1858), after Philip Doddridge (1702-1751)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

1.  The Savior kindly calls

Our children to His breast;

He folds them in His gracious arms,

Himself declares them blest.

2.  “Let them approach,” He cries,

“Nor scorning humble claim;

The heirs of heav’n are such as these,

For such as these I came.”

3.  With joy we bring them, Lord,

Devoting them to Thee,

Imploring that, as we are Thine,

Thine may our offspring be.

Almighty God, Before Thy Throne   1 comment

The Day of Judgment Fra Angelico

Above:  The Day of Judgment, by Fra Angelico

Image in the Public Domain

Hymn Source = The Lutheran Hymnal (1941), Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America

Text (written in 1756 yet published in 1760) by Anne Steele

Steele wrote the original version (with seven stanzas) for the Public Fast, February 6, 1756, related to the Seven Years’ War (1756-1763).

I read the third stanza and think of the use of religion and the Bible to justify the indefensible, including slavery, racism, “holy” wars, the burning of accused heretics, witch trials, and the range of -isms and phobias which teach us to denigrate and hate our fellow human beings.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

1.  Almighty Lord, before Thy throne,

Thy mourning people bend;

‘Tis on Thy grace in Christ alone

Our failing hopes depend.

2.  Dark judgments from Thy heavy hand

Thy dreadful pow’r display;

Yet mercy spares our guilty land,

And still w live to pray.

3.  How changed, alas, are truths divine

For error, guilt, and shame!

What impious numbers, bold in sin,

Disgrace the Christian name!

4.  Oh, turn us, turn us, mighty Lord;

Convert us by Thy grace!

Then shall our hearts obey Thy Word

And see again Thy face.

5.  Then, should oppressing foes invade,

We will not yield to fear,

Secure of all-sufficient aid

When God in Christ is near.

To Our Redeemer’s Glorious Name   1 comment

Candle Flame

Above:  Candle Flame

Image in the Public Domain

Hymn Source = The Lutheran Hymnal (1941), Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America

Text (published in 1760) by Anne Steele (1716-1778)

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

1.  To our Redeemer’s glorious name

Awake the sacred song.

Oh, may His love, immortal flame,

Tune ev’ry heart and tongue!

2.  His love, what human tho’t can reach,

What mortal tongue portray?

Imagination’s utmost stretch

In wonder dies away.

3.  He left His radiant throne on high,

Left realms of heav’nly bliss,

And came to earth to bleed and die–

Was ever love like this?

4.  Dear Lord, while we adoring pay

Our humble thanks to Thee,

May every heart with rapture say,

“The Savior died for me!”

5.  Oh, may the sweet, the blissful theme

Fill every heart and tongue

Till strangers love the charming name

And join the sacred song!

Father of Mercies, In Thy Word   1 comment

Church of the Ascension

Above:  The Gospel Book, Episcopal Church of the Ascension, Cartersville, Georgia, May 10, 2015

Image Source = Bill Monk, Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta

Hymn Source = The Lutheran Hymnal (1941), Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America

Words (published originally in twelve stanzas in 1760) by Anne Steele (1716-1778)

This version comes from the Bristol, England, Baptist Collection of Hymns Adapted to Public Worship (1769).

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

1.  Father of mercies, in Thy Word

What endless glory shines!

Forever be Thy name adored

For these celestial lines.

2.  Here may the blind and hungry come

And light and food receive;

Here shall the lowliest guest have room

And taste and see and live.

3.  Here springs of consolation rise

To cheer the fainting mind,

And thirsting souls receive supplies

And sweet refreshment find.

4.  Here the Redeemer’s welcome voice

Spreads hean’nly peace around,

And life and everlasting joys

Attend the blissful sound.

5.  Oh, may these heavenly pages be

My ever dear delight;

And still new beauties may I see

And still increasing light!

6.  Divine Instructor, gracious Lord,

Be Thou forever near;

Teach me to love Thy sacred Word

And view my Savior here.

The Savior Calls; Let Every Ear   1 comment

Beecher Spring, Florida

Above:  Beecher Springs, Florida, 2004

Image Source = R. Means

Image in the Public Domain

Hymn Source = The Lutheran Hymnal (1941), Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America

Words (published in 1760) by Anne Steele (1716-1778)

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

1.  The Savior calls; let every ear

Attend the heav’nly sound.

Ye doubting souls, dismiss your fear;

Hope smiles reviving round.

2.  For ev’ry thirsty, longing heart

Here streams of bounty flow

And life and health and bliss impart

To banish mortal woe.

3.  Here springs of sacred treasures rise

To ease your ev’ry pain;

Immortal fountain, full supplies!

Nor shall you thirst in vain.

4.  Ye sinners, come, ’tis Mercy’s voice;

The gracious call obey;

Mercy invites to heav’nly joys,

And can you yet delay?

5.  Dear Savior, draw reluctant hearts;

To Thee let sinners fly

And take the bliss Thy love imparts

And drink and never die.