Archive for the ‘Lent/Confession of Sin 1800s’ Category

O Lord, Turn Not Thy Face Away   1 comment

all-angels-eatonton

Above:  All Angels Episcopal Church, Eatonton, Georgia, January 22, 2017

Image Source = Bill Monk, Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta

Text (1562) by John Marckant; altered by Reginald Heber (1783-1826)

Hymn Source = The Hymnal (1941), Evangelical and Reformed Church

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O Lord, turn not Thy face away

From them that lowly lie,

Lamenting sore their sinful life

With tears and bitter cry.

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Thy mercy gates are open wide

To them that mourn their sin;

O shout them not against us, Lord,

But let us enter in.

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And need we, then, O Lord, repeat

The blessing which we crave,

When Thou dost know, before we speak,

The thing that we would have?

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Mercy, O Lord, mercy we ask,

This is the total sum;

For mercy, Lord, is all our prayer,

O let Thy mercy come!

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This is post #1800 of GATHERED PRAYERS.

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Dost Thou Truly Seek Renown   3 comments

crucifixion

Above:  The Crucifixion of Jesus

Image in the Public Domain

Anonymous Latin Text, 13th-15th Centuries

English Translation by John Athelstan Laurie Riley (1858-1945)

Hymn Source = The English Hymnal (1906), The Church of England

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Dost thou truly seek renown

Christ his glory sharing?

Wouldst thou win the heavenly crown

Victor’s meed declaring?

Tread the path the Saviour trod,

Look upon the crown of God,

See what he is wearing.

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This the King of heaven bore

In that sore contending;

This his sacred temples wore,

Honour to it lending;

In this helm he faced the foe,

On the Rood he laid him low,

Satan’s kingdom ending.

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Christ upon the Tree of Scorn,

In salvation’s hour,

Turned to gold these pricks of thorn

By his Passion’s power;

So on sinners, who had earned

Endless death, from sin returned,

Endless blessings shower.

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When in death’s embrace we lie,

Then, good Lord, be near us;

With thy presence fortify,

And with victory cheer us;

Turn our erring hearts to thee,

That we crowned for ay may be:

O good Jesu, hear us!

Praise for Every Scene Distressing   2 comments

Adoration of the Lamb

Above:  Adoration of the Lamb, by Jan Van Eyck

Image in the Public Domain

Text (1805) by Lewis Renatus West (1753-1826)

Hymn Source = Hymnal and Liturgies of the Moravian Church (Unitas Fratrum) (1923), Moravian Church in America

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Praise for every scene distressing,

Praise for all Thou didst endure,

Praise for every gift and blessing

Which Thy griefs for us procure;

In Thy ransomed congregation

Shall Thy death our theme remain,

Till Thou com’st with full salvation,

Lord of glory, Lamb once slain.

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Thou, to purchase our salvation,

Didst assume humanity;

Jesus, for Thy bitter passion

May we ever thankful be;

Filled with awe and humbly bowing,

At Thy feet we prostrate fall,

Gratefully this truth avowing,

That Thou art our All in awe.

Lord, As To Thy Dear Cross We Flee   2 comments

Icon of the Crucifixion Rublev

Above:  Icon of the Crucifixion, by Andrei Rublev

Image in the Public Domain

Hymn Source = The Hymnal (1895), Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A.

Text (1838) by John Hampden Gurney (1802-1862)

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Lord, as to Thy dear cross we flee,

And plead to be forgiven,

So let Thy life our pattern be,

And from our souls for heaven.

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Help us, through good report and ill,

Our daily cross to bear;

Like Thee, to do our Father’s will,

Our brethren’s griefs to share.

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Let grace our selfishness expel,

Our earthliness refine;

And kindness in our bosoms dwell,

As free and true as Thine.

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If joy shall at Thy bidding fly,

And grief’s dark day come on,

We, in our turn, would meekly cry,

“Father, Thy will be done.”

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Should friends misjudge, or foes defame,

Or brethren faithless prove,

Then, like Thine own, be all our aim

To conquer them by love.

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Kept peaceful in the midst of strife,

Forgiving and forgiven,

O may we lead the pilgrim’s life,

And follow Thee to heaven.

Lord, On Earth I Dwell Sad-Hearted   2 comments

A King's Burden

Above:  A King’s Burden

Image in the Public Domain

Original German Text (1700) by Caspar Neumann (1648-1715)

English Translation (1863) by Catherine Winkworth (1827-1878)

Hymn Source = Evangelical Lutheran Worship (1908), Evangelical Lutheran Joint Synod of Ohio and Other States (1818-1930)

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Lord, on earth I dwell sad-hearted,

Here I oft must mourn and sigh:

Wherefore hast Thou then departed,

Why didst Thou ascend on high?

Take me, take me hence with Thee,

Or abide, Lord, still with me;

Let Thy love and gifts be left,

That I be not all bereft.

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Leave Thy heart still inly near me,

Take mine hence where Thou art gone;

Open heav’n to me, and hear me,

When to Thee I cry alone;

When I cannot pray, O plead

With the Father in my stead;

Seated now at God’s right hand,

Help us here, Thy faithful hand.

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Worldly joys I cast behind me,

Let me choose the better part,

And though mortal chains yet bind me,

Heav’nward tend my thoughts and heart;

That my time through faith may be

Ordered for eternity;

Till we rise, all perils o’er,

Whither Thou hast gone before.

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Then return, the promise keeping,

That was made to us of old;

Raise the members that are sleeping,

Gnaw’d of death, beneath the mould;

Judge the evil world that deems

Thy sure words but empty dreams;

And for all our sorrows past

Let us know Thy joy at last.

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Not for Three or Four Transgressions   1 comment

Confession of Sin

Above:  The Prayer of Confession, Holy Eucharist Rite II, The Book of Common Prayer (1979)

Scan by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

Text by Greville Phillimore (1821-1884)

Hymn Source = In Memoriam (1884)

The title of this hymn in In Memoriam (1884) is “In the Time of Cattle Plague,” with a reference to Amos 1:3.

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Not for three or four transgressions,

But for added sin to sin,

Lord, we pour our late confessions,

Pardon from our Judge to win;

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For our pride and self-reliance,

For intemperance and shame;

For the lusts, and evil-speakings

Which profane Thy holy name;

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For each cold and lukewarm service,

For each false and loveless word;

For the cross, despised and slighted,

On which hung our dying Lord.

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God have mercy! God have pity!

Hear our earnest, contrite prayer;

Ere thine anger turn to vengeance,

God of life and healing, spare.

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Spare our sheep and spare our cattle,

Spare the now plague-stricken land;

Spare man made in Thy own image;

Bid Thine angel stay his hand.

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Pour upon us supplication.

All our hearts to fear Thee move;

And, on Thy repentant people,

Send down still the gifts of love.

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Maker of this earth and heaven,

Father, Son, and Holy Ghost,

Unto Thee our praise is given,

Through the Saviour of the lost.

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Darkly Frowns the Ev’ning Sky   2 comments

Harrowing of Hades

Above:  The Harrowing of Hades

Image in the Public Domain

Text by Greville Phillimore (1821-1884)

Hymn Source = Sursum Corda:  A Book of Praise (1898), Baptist General Convention for Foreign Missions

William Jensen Reynolds writes from a Southern Baptist perspective:

The three most significant hymnals published for Baptists in the North during the last half of the nineteenth century were The Baptist Hymn and Tune Book (1871), The Baptist Hymnal (1883), and Sursum Corda (1898).  All of these were the work of the American Baptist Publishing Society in Philadelphia.  The first, a large collection of 980 hymns, failed to meet with general acceptance, largely because of the inferior quality of the tunes.  The second collection is of better quality, and while it gives evidence of the rapidly emerging gospel song, it also reveals the initial influence among Baptists of Hymns Ancient and Modern, the most influential English hymnal of the nineteenth century.  Sursum Corda, compiled by E. H. Johnson, went further in this direction.  The compiler’s disregard for the emerging gospel song and his excessive borrowing of Anglican hymns and tunes resulted in a hymnal of the highest quality, but one unacceptable to the majority of Baptist congregations.  All of this plus the Latin title was too much for too many Baptists even in the North.

Companion to Baptist Hymnal (Nashville, TN:  Broadman Press, 1976), page 18

I wondered why an Anglican hymn based on the Harrowing of Hell was in a Baptist hymnal.  Now I know.  I also approve of borrowing Anglican hymns, especially from Hymns Ancient and Modern.  And the Latin title is a nice touch.  The fact of my Episcopal affiliation is showing, is it not?

Sursum Corda is Latin for “Lift up your hearts,” as in that which precedes “We lift them up to the Lord.”

The Baptist General Convention for Foreign Missions helped to form the Northern Baptist Convention in 1907.

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Darkly frowns the ev’ning sky;

Falls for woe the mourner’s eye:

Silent is the rocky tomb

Where as yet no dead have come,

Armed soldiers by the side,

They have left the Crucified.

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God! my God! and dost thou show

Wonders midst the dead below?

They who slumber ‘neath the earth,

Shall they wake to second birth?

Who shall these dread gates unfold,

Barred through all the days of old?

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Lo! the doors are opening,

And the dead behold their King:

See! the awful fathers know

Him, who lays death’s terrors low:

Hark! he bids the ancients rise

Ransomed by his sacrifice.

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When we sink into the dust,

May we fix on thee our trust!

Saviour of the sons of men,

May we die to live again!

Dying, may our faith recall

Thy dear death and burial.

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